One Team Different Roles… which will you choose?

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As part of the newest Police Officer recruitment campaign to join the Degree Holder Entry Programme, applicants have a choice of routes to apply for. The Detective Entry Programme or Uniformed Officer.

To help you make your choice, we interviewed some of our uniformed officers and detectives so they can introduce you to some of the different roles and departments you could work in…

Uniformed

Detectives

Applications open on Monday 3rd May and close on Monday 17th May 2021.

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New Chief Constable joins Lancashire

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Chris Rowley took the position of Chief Constable of Lancashire Constabulary on Thursday 1 April 2021 – and says he’s very proud to be taking the helm at one of the country’s top performing police forces.

Chris was chosen as Andy Rhodes’ successor in a competitive selection process led by the Police and Crime Commissioner, Clive Grunshaw, in December last year. He joins us on promotion from his previous role of Deputy Chief Constable of Humberside Police, a post he’d held since 2017.

Chris has spent most of his career in West Yorkshire, amassing 25 years’ service working mainly in local policing and crime. As an Ops Manager he successfully reduced the number of repeat burglaries by introducing a predictive policing model, and as a Chief Superintendent he led on major change programmes across the force. He also has vast experience in policing large scale incidents and major events.

Prior to being promoted to T/ACC at South Yorkshire, Chris was Head of the West Yorkshire Police Protective Services Crime Department and Head of the Regional Organised Crime Unit for Yorkshire and the Humber, where he dealt with the most serious and complex crimes facing the force and the county.

Chris was appointed as Deputy Chief Constable of Humberside Police in October 2017, leading a broad and challenging portfolio encompassing Corporate Development (Strategic Change, Performance, Audit and Inspection and Demand), Professional Standards, Information Management & Security, Communications and Legal Services.

Chris is married and has two grown up sons. He is a borne and bred Yorkshireman and knows that crossing the Pennines into Lancashire as the first external Chief Constable in thirty years is no mean feat.

Speaking about his appointment to Lancashire Constabulary, CC Rowley said: “I am really looking forward to getting to know the staff in Lancashire for myself, as wherever I go, people always speak so highly of the force and its people. I have always held Lancashire in high regard and consider it a real privilege to serve as Chief Constable.

“I am passionate about delivering the best possible service to our communities and to victims of crime; that’s our core business. I’m also committed to ensuring that our staff have the right training and support to be able to do this. I want to get out and about over the next few weeks and months to meet people, listen to them and talk through ideas that we can develop to ensure we continue to meet those high standards in the future.”

Chris said: “If you see me, please do come and speak to me. I like a good, strong cup of tea and a biscuit and I love speaking to staff and finding out what’s working, what’s not and where I can help continue to improve what is already a fantastic organisation.”

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PC Yasmin Hylton speaks to BBC Radio 5 Live

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PC Yasmin Hylton spoke to BBC Radio 5 Live about her experiences as a trainee at Lancashire Police and in particular, her experiences as a mixed race officer.

The interview was part of a review of the BBC drama ‘Red, White and Blue’ written and directed by Steve McQueen charting the experiences of Leroy Logan, an officer in the MET police in the 1980s.

Leroy Logan also took part in the BBC Radio 5 Live interview, and Yasmin explained that her experience of racism in the police couldn’t be any more different to that of Leroy’s.

Yasmin explained: “I have always had a positive experience and having more BAME officers allows us to police our communities better. I know that Lancashire Police are working on encouraging more BAME officers to apply to join us.”

For more information about the Positive Action support available register your details.

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Ranked 4th in The Inclusive Top 50 UK Employers List!

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In recognition of our continued dedication to workplace diversity, we have been ranked 4th in The Inclusive Top 50 UK Employers List – a rise of 8 places up the list from last year where we placed 12th.  Now in its fifth year, the list has become the leading cross industry index harnessing best practice and innovation to drive inclusion for all.

Lancashire Constabulary’s position reflects the high standard to which they operate. As well as addressing areas of improvement, Lancashire Constabulary have developed and delivered high impact initiatives to actively implement solutions.

Deputy Chief Constable of Lancashire Constabulary, Terry Woods commented “I am absolutely delighted that our strong focus on diversity and inclusion has been so highly commended by the Inclusive Top 50 Companies Award judges. Rising from last year’s position of 12th to 4th place, reflects our commitment and hard work across the organisation to encompassing equality and inclusion.  Inclusion is absolutely vital to us as we strive to keep our communities safe and feeling safe – we can only be effective in that if our workforce is truly reflective of the communities we serve. We have more work to do in this area and are committed to delivering an integrated inclusive people-centred approach to everyone who chooses to work with us.”

View the full list of Inclusive Employers

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Four Decades Well-Spent

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Special inspector Peter Allen recently reached the impressive milestone of 40 years working as a volunteer to help keep our county’s communities safe.

Peter has worked pretty much everywhere, with everyone, and countless colleagues have called on him for advice and guidance over the years. But joining the Specials was not a decision he made quickly. Peter explained: “At school, the fathers of two of the lads in my year were Specials, my training officer at work was a Special, two pensioners at work were former Specials in Chorley during World War Two, and a member of the Specials sang in the choir at Church.

“In April 1980, my mother had been hit by a motorcycle sustaining some very serious injuries, and I remember rushing to the hospital and speaking to the traffic officer who was dealing with the accident. He was carrying my mother’s shopping bag with a shoe hanging out, I wondered what I would have done if I had been at the accident; I wanted to learn how to ‘help’ in some way.

“What finally tipped me into applying was seeing two lads I knew on duty in police uniforms in Penwortham. Whilst I’d been interested in the police I was also interested in vehicles, so joined Leyland Trucks as a commercial student in 1974. In all honesty, I didn’t feel I was good enough to be a police officer as I was never very good at sport and most of the lads I knew from school who joined the police were rugby players etc. However, I knew these two and thought if they can do it I will give it a shot.
“So I finally applied in July 1980, on my 24th birthday.”

Peter was proud to be accepted, and served his first 30 years in South Ribble, working across all divisions and at HQ after that. “This has given me a fantastic insight into policing in the many different and diverse communities across the county,” he said.

Away from his voluntary work, Peter carried out a balancing act with various roles and extensive travel in his main job at the company which began as Leyland Trucks. Peter said: “I worked full-time until I was 50 then shifted to working part-time as my father was struggling caring for my mother. Having a free day during the week enabled me to take my parents to appointments. My father always booked them at 11 am on a Friday so we could call in at the chip shop on the way home.”

Would Peter recommend the Specials to people? “Absolutely. Firstly if you want to be a cop you can try before you buy, and if it’s not right for you then you haven’t ruined your career. It gives you an insight into other important roles supporting the police. I’d also recommend it to public-spirited people who want to give something back to society.”

Peter retired at 55 but still enjoys his role at Lancashire Police: “I think I have been able to make a difference and the police have taught me a number of skills that I have applied in life,” he said. “I have made a lot of good friends over the years, and having police experiences as a Special helps you prioritise things in life and not worry about trivial things.”
Peter has made an excellent contribution to our communities over the year, and we are extremely grateful to him for his service and wisdom. We hope to keep him in the Lancashire Police family for many more years to come.

Being a Special is an incredibly rewarding career which attracts people from all walks of life. Could a voluntary role helping to keep the people of Lancashire safe be for you? Find out more here. (link to Specials page)

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As One Canine Career Comes to an End Another Begins Celebrating Fearless Force Members – PDs Zeus and Koa

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Our intrepid Police Dogs are highly respected members of our Constabulary, and sadly we will soon be saying goodbye to one of our most exceptional colleagues, PD Zeus.

The 10-year-old Dutch Herder is due to retire, making way for the young ones as we welcome new recruit PD Koa.

Zeus is the oldest General Purpose dog on the department. A police dog for seven years, he is also a Tactical Firearms Support Dog. As part of his TFSD role Zeus has helped protect lots of VIPs, including members of the Royal Family. Everyone knows when Zeus is on duty as he’s so vocal you can hear him barking in the van from half a mile away.


Throughout his career PD Zeus has helped arrest numerous baddies and locate stolen property and discarded weapons. This year he assisted in tracing a missing women so she could get the help and treatment she needed, and his proudest moment whilst working with his firearms colleagues was being instrumental in the arrest of two murder suspects.

Now ready to put his paws up, Zeus will continue to live with his handler during retirement following his valiant work helping to keep Lancashire’s public safe.


Snapping at his heels is PD Koa, a Malinois Cross Herder. Koa has had a cracking start to his career, aiding in numerous arrests across Lancashire, including one which involved taking his handler along the muddiest track we’ve ever seen in hot pursuit of a suspect. He is certainly one brave, bold dog. Nothing fazes him whatsoever. He can be snoring in the van one minute and up raring to go as soon as the van stops. Koa is clearly following courageously in Zeus’s footsteps.


It’s no wonder a career as a Police Dog Hander is so sought after. Apart from having the honour of living and working with incredible dogs like Zeus and Koa, the training is second to none.

Our Dog Training Unit at Lancashire Constabulary’s Hutton HQ is known not only throughout the country but globally, thanks to its world-class courses.


Do you have what it takes to be a Police Dog Handler?

Find out more here:

https://www.lancashire.police.uk/about-us/our-organisation/dog-unit/#:~:text=Lancashire%20Police%20Dog%20Training%20Unit%20is%20known%20not,but%20globally%2C%20thanks%20to%20its%20world-class%20training%20courses

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‘Police Now’ – National Graduate Scheme

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We are delighted to say that 23 officers have so far chosen to join us through Police Now’s national graduate scheme to go straight into neighbourhood policing.

One of them is PC Charles McCarthy, who applied after originally embarking on a career in accounting and finance gained at Liverpool John Moores University.

“I had never really considered being a police officer until last year, although I had been told I would make a good one by my mother and my sister-in-law, who is also an officer,” he said. “Often while working, the radio would be on and there would be alarming incident reports mentioned, and this is what convinced me to join the police, to help make a difference.”

Away from work, Charles, an avid Evertonian, can usually be found at the gym with his partner. He enjoys a variety of sports, with his biggest love being Mixed Martial Arts.

Having trained and competed aged 12 to 21, Charles was President/Captain of the LJMU MMA Society at Uni, leading the team to become one of the most successful University MMA teams in the country. With his energy now focused on neighbourhood policing, Charles, 25, is excited be out in division serving the communities of West Lancashire.

He said: “My wish is that when my head hits the pillow, I have a sense of accomplishment by contributing to society and perhaps improving a person’s life. I am certain that being a PC will not only be a life-changing career and make me very happy, but also improve me as an individual.”

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New Recruits Making Lancashire Constabulary a Force to be Reckoned With

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In response to the Home Office call for national forces to recruit 20,000 police officers by March 2023, we’ve been busy assembling our ranks with the county’s finest. Our campaigns to attract high calibre student officers to our new entry programmes have been a huge success.

The county’s new processes to becoming a fully-fledged officer are the Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship (PCDA) and the Degree Holder Entry Programme (DHEP). Both are based on curricula from the College of Policing’s new PEQF Framework for the national Policing Vision 2025 and combine study with patrol work.

Due to the increasing demand for investigative support, we are also introducing a dedicated detective pathway under the DHEP – a two-year programme which combines working as a police officer with a development and training programme to become a fully qualified detective (PIP 2 Investigator). This has generated enormous interest for job alerts and open days. For our homegrown courses we are extremely proud to be partnering UCLan – one of the first universities in the country to offer the new PCDA. Our debut intake of 35 apprentices underwent intensive training to be signed off fit for independent patrol in October 2020.

Following hot on the apprentices’ heels were our first waves of around 170 DHEP recruits last year, with a third cohort of at least 80 to begin in February 2021. These rigorous programmes are ensuring that, once fully trained, officers will be well qualified, both academically and operationally, to work within the modern policing environment.

Vitally, they also provide pathways for people from all walks of life, in line with our dedication to building a force that reflects the communities we serve.

At the end of the programmes recruits choose to specialise in one of the five core areas of policing: immediate response, community, road, Intel or investigation. Degree holders can also apply via Police Now’s national graduate scheme to go straight into neighbourhood policing.

So far 23 officers have chosen to join us through their scheme this year, undergoing intensive training so they can quickly work independently in the community.

All of these routes into Lancashire Police had a fantastic response in 2020 – 4,040 potential candidates expressed an interest in joining our force, nearly 2,400 signed up for our PC job alerts, and we welcomed close to a hundred transferees. We continue to seek first-class candidates who are passionate about policing.

If you, or anyone you know, is interested in pursuing a career as an officer, you can find out about the full eligibility requirements here.

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